Podcast: How to Keep Your Teaching Fresh

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Magna publications released this free podcast by Maryellen Weimer called “How to Keep Your Teaching Fresh.”

Mary Ellen Wiemer, PhD, has been the editor of The Teaching Professor newsletter since 1987.  She is a professor emerita of Teaching and Learning at Pen State Burks and won Penn State’s Milton S. Eisenhower award for distinguished teaching in 2005.

Her published works include: Inspired College Teaching: A Career-Long Resource for Professional Growth (Jossey-Bass, 2010), Enhancing Scholarly Work on Teaching and Learning: Professional Literature that Makes a Difference (Jossey-Bass, 2006),  Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Jossey-Bass, 2002).

The practices are simple and straightforward. Most importantly, they don’t require a large investment of your time.

Dr. Weimer covers proven practices for:

  • The do’s and don’ts of implementing new teaching strategies
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of new instructional methods
  • Grading listening as part of participation
  • Ensuring students complete the readings before class
  • Reflection methods to help experienced instructors stay fresh
  • Plus, Maryellen gives you an example of an intellectually robust extra credit assignment that will help other students and save you time.

The podcast is available here: http://info.magnapubs.com/maryellen-weimer-on-how-to-keep-your-teaching-fresh

 

Instructional Design 101 Series, Part II

Instructional Design 101 Series Image Slide

Cengage Learning had make the second post in a new series called Instructional Design 101.  This second installment is “Why Does Your Institution Need Instructional Design?”  The focus of the post is why instructional design is so important, especially for online classes.  While the series is used to market their Instructional Design (ID) Team, it looks like it will contain some useful information of the basics of working with instructional designers or to inform faculty on how to do the ID work themselves.

This link will take you to the current post, as will show additional posts as they are released: http://blog.cengage.com/tag/instructional-design-101/

Instructional Design 101 Series

Image for Cengage's Instructional Design 101 blog series

Cengage Learning had make the first post in a new series called Instructional Design 101.  This first installment is “What is Instructional Design?”  While the series is used to market their Instructional Design (ID) Team, it looks like it will contain some useful information of the basics of working with instructional designers or to inform faculty on how to do the ID work themselves.

This link will take you to the current post, as will show additional posts as they are released: http://blog.cengage.com/tag/instructional-design-101/

Infographic: 128 Words to Use Instead of “Very”

This useful infographic is from proofreadingservices.com.  It provides some great examples to assist you in being very accurate exact in your writing.

Infographic - 128 Word to Use Instead of Very

Free Microsoft Office

Slide for Installing Microsoft Office 2016

John A. Logan College faculty and staff can install Microsoft Office 2016 on up to 5 computers for free.  Office 2016 is available for both Windows and Mac computer.  Apps for mobile devices are also available.  The video below shows how you can install Microsoft Office from within you JALC webmail (Office 365) interface. Continue reading

Jenzabar Jam Podcast: 10th Day Attendance Reporting In the MyJALC Portal

Slide for Jenzabar Jam 10th Day Attendance Report Podcast

The video below demonstrates how to enter your 10th day attendance report in the MyJALC Portal using the Enter Grades page.  For this report you use the “ATT” (Attending) and “NAT” (Not Attending) selections from the pull-down menu in the “Miderm Grade” column.  When entries for each student have been selected, click the “Save” button to submit your report.  The handout for this procedure is available here: https://www.jalc.edu/files/uploads/global/tlc/10th_Day_Attendance_Report_In_the_MyJALC_Portal.pdf.

Webinar: Technology and the Evolving Business Model in Higher Education

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Title: Technology and the Evolving Business Model in Higher Education
Date: Thursday, August 25, 2016
Time: 02:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Duration: 1 hour

Technology and the Evolving Business Model in Higher Education

Technology is changing the business model for colleges and universities in myriad ways.

Regardless of whether institutions are primarily about educating students in person or online, technology is providing new tools to track and encourage student success and to reshape how colleges think about retention and completion. In turn, these efforts have a major impact on the economic health of colleges.

For the many colleges that now offer online courses or full programs, technology is expanding the universe of potential students and creating a range of business models to serve those students.

In this webinar we will explore the strategies some colleges are using, and the challenges faced by institutions as they seek to use technology to strengthen their financial bases.

Join Inside Higher Ed editors Scott Jaschik and Doug Lederman for a lively discussion on these issues Thursday, August 25 at 2:00 PM ET.

Speakers

Scott Jaschik, Editor, Inside Higher Ed, has been published in The New York Times, The Boston Globe,The Washington Post, and Salon. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

Doug Lederman, Editor, Inside Higher Ed, has been published in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, and The Christian Science Monitor. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle from 1999-2003.

Infographic: Setting the Rules

Setting the Rules Infographic

Infographic – What Does Great Blended Learning Look Like?

Infographic - What Does Good Online Learning Look Like?

Via: https://anethicalisland.wordpress.com/2013/04/22/blended-learning/

Attributes of A Good Educator

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Building on the work of Frank C. Pearce, who identified the seven characteristics of an effective adult educator (see post here), Colorado Mountain College (CMC) has provided a list of seven characteristics of a “good educator.”  In the earlier work, Pearce stated:

The teacher’s foremost concern must be the adult student, and his effectiveness in this concern must be judged on his ability to help the student to develop and maintain self-confidence. The ideal teacher could be described as people oriented, more interested in people than things, more interested in individuality than conformity, and more interested in finding solutions than in following rules. He would be considered a mature, integrated personality that had chosen his own role and relationship to society and coveted for everyone else the same privilege.

The updated list by CMC of “A Good Educator” is as follows:

  1. Listens – Listening is as important as effective speaking. It is an important aspect of effective teaching because much learning takes place when the student is expressing an idea.
  2. Helps insecure learners – Learners who lack confidence in themselves are common in adult learning. A secure environment is important and positive reinforcement keeps the desire to learn alive.
  3. Uses Humor – Humor is good therapy. It puts people at ease, allows them to relax and lets tension disappear. Humor helps promote learning.
  4. Maintains a positive climate – By carefully bringing in each member of the group, you can create a good climate. By welcoming diversity and encouraging the expression of cultural differences, you can enhance the learning environment. By positive reinforcement and by welcoming disagreement, you can promote learning and the stimulus to learn.
  5. Offers a genuine friendship – This can be effective if you know your students and allow them to know you.
  6. Changes approaches – Using a variety of teaching methods will increase interest and help to eliminate boredom. This takes careful planning and knowledge of available resources and media.
  7. Gives regular feedback – This can be in the form of positive reinforcement or evaluations such as tests or oral communication. Continued feedback helps the students understand their progress and can be a tool to help you understand how well the needs of the students are being met.

Colorado Mountain College.  Faculty Manual 2012-2014.

The CMC Faculty Handbook is available here.