Infographic: Copyright In Education

This infographic provides a good overview of copyright, including copyright, Creative Commons, public domain, fair use, and flow charts on copyright issues.

infographic Copyright in Educaiton

Improving Access to Postsecondary Education With Captions

Instructional Design 101 Series, Part VI

Instructional Design Series Icon

Cengage Learning had make the second post in a new series called Instructional Design 101.  This second installment is “Instructional Designer/Faculty Partnership.” The focus of the post is why instructional design is so important, especially for online classes.  While the series is used to market their Instructional Design (ID) Team, it looks like it will contain some useful information of the basics of working with instructional designers or to inform faculty on how to do the ID work themselves.

This link will take you to the current post, as will show additional posts as they are released: http://blog.cengage.com/tag/instructional-design-101/

Kessler International’s New Academic Dishonesty Survey

Kessler International recently released the results of a new student survey on Academic Dishonesty.  The most revealing parts of the survey were number of student who said they had cheated in school (86%) and the number who said it was OK to cheat (54%).  Additionally, 97% of those who said they had cheated said they had never been identified as cheating.

Kessler’s website privided this summary of their findings:

  • 86% of the students surveyed claimed they cheated in some way in school.
  • 54% of the students surveyed indicated that cheating was OK. Some went so far as to say it is necessary to stay competitive.
  • 97% of the admitted cheaters say that they have never been identified as cheating.
  • 76% copied word for word someone else’s assignments
  • 79% of the students surveyed admitted to plagiarizing their assignments from the Internet or citing sources when appropriate.
  • Only 12% indicated that they would never cheat because of ethics.
  • 42% indicated that they purchased custom term papers, essays and thesis online.
  • 28% indicated that they had a service take their online classes for them.
  • 72% indicated that they had used their phone, tablet or computer to cheat in class.

Another finding was that professors are becoming increasing unethical in the face of pressure to have their students perform well.  Students reported faculty provided exam answers in advance of exams or while students were taking exams, while others routinely curved results because of poor results.  Students also indicated they felt pressured to purchase books that the professor had written in order to complete the class.

The survey was of 300 students at public and private institutions, including online universities.

The results posted are available on Kessler’s site here.

Instructional Design 101 Series, Part V

Instructional Design Icon

Cengage Learning had make the second post in a new series called Instructional Design 101.  This second installment is “Why Use An Instructional Designer?”  The focus of the post is why instructional design is so important, especially for online classes.  While the series is used to market their Instructional Design (ID) Team, it looks like it will contain some useful information of the basics of working with instructional designers or to inform faculty on how to do the ID work themselves.

This link will take you to the current post, as will show additional posts as they are released: http://blog.cengage.com/tag/instructional-design-101/

Infographic: Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy Verbs

Infographic Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Verbs

Faculty Focus: Tips for Encouraging Student Participation in Classroom Discussions

icon for Tips for Encouraging Student Participation In Classroom Discussions

This Faculty Focus Special Report puts together some of the best articles from the Teaching Professor newsletter on the topic of student participation and classroom discussion.  The following articles are included in the report.

  1. Assessing Class Participation: One Useful Strategy
  2. Participation Blues from the Student Perspective
  3. Roll the Dice and Students Participate
  4. Those Students Who Participate Too Much
  5. Teaching How to Question: Participation Rubrics.
  6. Student Recommendations for Encouraging Participation
  7. Is There a Place for Games in the College Classroom?
  8. Discouraging Over Participators
  9. Putting the Participation Puzzle Together
  10. To Call On or Not to Call On: That Continues to Be the Question
  11. Creating a Class Participation Rubric
  12.  It Costs to Cut Class

The pdf of the report is available here.

Instructional Design 101 Series, Part IV

Instructional Design Series Icon

Cengage Learning had make the second post in a new series called Instructional Design 101.  This second installment is “Instructional Designers Are Not Faculty.”  The focus of the post is why instructional design is so important, especially for online classes.  While the series is used to market their Instructional Design (ID) Team, it looks like it will contain some useful information of the basics of working with instructional designers or to inform faculty on how to do the ID work themselves.

This link will take you to the current post, as will show additional posts as they are released: http://blog.cengage.com/tag/instructional-design-101/

Top 10 Technologies that Will Become Important in Education Over the Next Decade

Top 10 Technologies that Will Become Important in Education Over the Next Decade

As part of their article “Top 10 Education Technologies that Will Be Dead and Gone in the Next Decade”, in CampusTechnology.com, Dian Schaffhauser and Rhea Kelly provided this graphic with the results of 2016 Teaching with Technology Survey about the technologies faculty respondents believe will be important over the next decade.  To see their full discussion of the topic, check out the article here.

Top 10 Education Technologies that Faculty Wish Would Die in the Next Decade

Top 10 Education Technologies that faculty wish would die in the next decade

As part of their article “Top 10 Education Technologies that Will Be Dead and Gone in the Next Decade”, in CampusTechnology.com, Dian Schaffhauser and Rhea Kelly provided this graphic with the results of 2016 Teaching with Technology Survey about the technologies they wish would disappear over the next decade.  To see their full discussion of the topic, check out the article here.