Inclusion By Design: A Tool for Faculty

After the 2013 Professional and Organizational Development Network (POD Network) Conference, three professors got together to create a tool to assist faculty with addressing inclusion in their courses.   They “were driven by a lack of available resources that provide a practical approach to digging deep into the nuances of one’s course.”   Inclusion By Design is the outcome of this collaborative effort.

In looking back at their work they authors said:

We spent a few years of designing and wrestling with what to call our creation (tool, audit, survey?) and eventually decided that it simply was a ‘tool’ to explore inclusion in one’s syllabus and course design. In our ongoing research, deliberations, and presentations of this tool at national conferences, three areas of intentional exploration emerged: inclusion and course context; text; and subtext. The complete tool is rather lengthy and exhaustive, rooted in theory and research on inclusion, multicultural education, universal design, implicit/unconscious bias, and the hidden curriculum

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Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Faculty Focus: Classroom Discussion

Faculty Focus posted an entry to their blog about classroom discussions to address the following scenario:

In the typical college classroom a small handful of students make the vast majority of comments. As a teacher you want to create a classroom environment that helps students of various learning styles and personalities to feel comfortable enough to contribute as well as understand the importance of class preparation and active participation. To reach this goal requires a constant balancing act of encouraging quiet, reflective students to speak up and, occasionally, asking the most active contributors to hold back from commenting in order to give others a chance.

Faculty Focus asked members of its LinkedIn group to post their strategies for engaging students through classroom discussion.  They posted some excerpts from their members to the blog.

The full post, with member excerpts, is available here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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